System integrity issues

When public officials try to silence criticism

It is human nature. People don’t like to be criticized. However, those who hold public office must accept criticism as part of holding office. We have the right (and the duty) to hold our officials accountable for respecting our rights and spending our tax dollars wisely. Usually, the way public officials try to hide from accountability is to persuade the legislature to frame sunshine laws as...

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Should we consider e-voting?

As we approach an election, we hear people asking why they can’t vote online using their personal computer or mobile devices, just as we do banking. People favoring e-voting argue that Internet voting offers greater speed and convenience, especially for overseas and military voters. However, computer and network experts point out that online voting is dangerous to the integrity of U.S....

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Beware of hypocrites in politics!

At first, the title might seem a bit silly. It’s like saying “beware of drunks in a bar” or “beware of thrill seekers in an amusement park.” It’s something to be expected. And one of the problems in American politics is that it is something to be expected. Way too often. A case in point: Josh Duggar For two years ending with his resignation last month, Mr. Duggar, 27, was executive director of...

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The dark side of Christmas

Christmas is a beautiful season, in both its religious and secular manifestations. We focus on Mary, Joseph, and the Baby in the manger, on the angels singing Gloria, the shepherds and wise men; but these are only part of the Christmas story. If we confine our telling of the Christmas story to what we learned as children, we risk losing much of its power. What does the Christmas story have to do...

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Freedom of Information laws

Freedom of Information (“sunshine”) laws establish the right of the people and the media to access data held by national, state, or local governments. More than 70 countries have freedom of information laws on their books. In the United States, the federal government and all 50 state (and District of Columbia) governments have such laws. Some states expand the idea to mandate open government...

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